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Practical Git: Capture code history snapshots with git add/commit/push

Practical Git: Capture code history snapshots with git add/commit/push

3:42
When working with Git, the most common thing developers do is stage, commit, and push the changes they make to a code base - this "edit -> stage -> commit -> push" cycle is the main workflow when using Git; it lets developers make "snapshots" of changes to their codebase which they can share and revert back to. In this lesson, we make some changes to our codebase and then `git add` (stage), `git commit` (store in history), and `git push` (sync with our remote repository) those changes. We also use `git status` along the way to see an update of where our repository is at.
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egghead.io

When working with Git, the most common thing developers do is stage, commit, and push the changes they make to a code base - this "edit -> stage -> commit -> push" cycle is the main workflow when using Git; it lets developers make "snapshots" of changes to their codebase which they can share and revert back to. In this lesson, we make some changes to our codebase and then git add (stage), git commit (store in history), and git push (sync with our remote repository) those changes. We also use git status along the way to see an update of where our repository is at.

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ImRob

trying to follow along with your example, should the files match up? Your repo is example-utility-functions instead of just utility-functions

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Trevor

The git commands are meant to be general to be applied to any git repo :) Thanks for watching.

In reply to ImRob
HEY, QUICK QUESTION!
Joel's Head
Why are we asking?