RXjs

Learn reactive programming

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What Is RxJS?

Creating An Observable with RxJS

Conclusion: when to use Subjects

ReplaySubject: remembering events from the past

Multicast with a selector argument, as a sandbox

Reusable multicasting with Subject factories

Multicasting shortcuts: publish() and variants

Stopping a shared observable execution

RefCount: automatically starting and stopping an execution

Connection operator: multicast and connect

Using a Subject as an Event Bus

BehaviorSubject: representing a value over time

AsyncSubject: representing a computation that yields a final value

Subject: an Observable and Observer hybrid

An Observable execution may only have one Observer

Introduction to RxJS Marble Testing

What RxJS operators are

Observables are the foundation in RxJS

Let's learn RxJS

Creating Observable From Scratch

Starting a Stream with SwitchMap

Overview of Cycle.js

Exporting values from components through sinks

Isolating component instances

Multiple independent instances of a component

Using the component in the main() function

Our first component: a labeled slider

Model-View-Intent pattern for separation of concerns

Body-Mass Index calculator built in Cycle.js

Using the HTTP Driver

An interactive counter in Cycle.js

From toy DOM Driver to real DOM Driver

Hyperscript as our alternative to template languages

Fine-grained control over the DOM Source

Making our toy DOM Driver more flexible

Generalizing run() function for more types of sources

Read effects from the DOM: click events

Introducing run() and driver functions

Customizing effects from the main function

Main function and effects functions

The Cycle.js principle: separating logic from effects

Yolk (An RxJS UI Library) in 7 Minutes

Understand Reactive Programming using RxJS

Demystifying Cold and Hot Observables in RxJS

RxJS - map vs flatMap

RxJS Observables vs Promises

rx tutorial about What Is RxJS?

What Is RxJS?

2:31 rx

RxJS Observables represent a collection of values over time, and can be accessed in familiar ways similar to arrays. RxJS can be thought of as underscore or lodash for asynchronous operations!

rx tutorial about Creating An Observable with RxJS

Creating An Observable with RxJS

6:53 rx

Let's learn the basic anatomy of an RxJS Observable by creating one from scratch. In this lesson, we create a simple Observable. It covers handling asynchronicity, emitting values, observable completion and error handling.

rx tutorial about Conclusion: when to use Subjects

Conclusion: when to use Subjects

2:36 rx

As a conclusion to this course about RxJS Subjects, lets review when and why should you use them.

rx tutorial about ReplaySubject: remembering events from the past

ReplaySubject: remembering events from the past

5:41 rx

A BehaviorSubject can remember the latest value emitted, but what if we wanted Observer B to see all the previous values emitted in the past? We can't do that with BehaviorSubject, but there is ReplaySubject, which allows us to do that. This lessons teaches you everything you need to know about ReplaySubjects.

rx tutorial about Multicast with a selector argument, as a sandbox

Multicast with a selector argument, as a sandbox

7:11 rx

Let's explore a different use of the multicast() operator in RxJS, where you can provide a selector function as a sandbox where the shared Observable is available.

rx tutorial about Reusable multicasting with Subject factories

Reusable multicasting with Subject factories

5:19 rx

The way we use publish() (or multicast with an RxJS Subject) makes the shared Observable not reusable if the shared execution happens to complete or emit an error. In this lesson we will see how to use a simple Subject factory function in order to create a new Subject, one for each shared execution, whenever connect() is called.

rx tutorial about Multicasting shortcuts: publish() and variants

Multicasting shortcuts: publish() and variants

4:21 rx

Because using multicast with a new Subject is such a common pattern, there is a shortcut in RxJS for this: the publish() operator. This lesson introduces publish() and its variants publishReplay(), publishBehavior(), publishLast(), share(), and shows how they simplify the creation of multicasted Observables.

rx tutorial about Stopping a shared observable execution

Stopping a shared observable execution

2:39 rx

ConnectableObservable has the connect() method to conveniently dictate the start of the shared execution of the source Observable. However, we need a mechanism to dictate the stop of the shared execution, otherwise a leak happens. This lesson will teach you how to do that, and it's all about Subscriptions.

rx tutorial about RefCount: automatically starting and stopping an execution

RefCount: automatically starting and stopping an execution

4:45 rx

With the connect() method on a ConnectableObservable, the programmer is responsible for avoiding leaked executions of shared RxJS Observables. This lesson will teach you about refCount(), a handy operator that creates an automatically connected Observable, to avoid manually using connect().

rx tutorial about Connection operator: multicast and connect

Connection operator: multicast and connect

5:14 rx

We have seen how Subjects are useful for sharing an execution of an RxJS observable to multiple observers. However, this technique requires some laborious setting up. In this lesson we will learn about the multicast() operator which helps solve the same problem with less code, and with a neater API.

rx tutorial about Using a Subject as an Event Bus

Using a Subject as an Event Bus

3:57 rx

Every Subject is an Observer, meaning we can freely use the Observer methods next(), error(), complete() to manually send events to the Subject. This lesson will teach you how to use a Subject as an Event Bus through the Observer methods.

rx tutorial about BehaviorSubject: representing a value over time

BehaviorSubject: representing a value over time

3:31 rx

Whenever we have multiple observers sharing the same execution, some of those observers may arrive "too late". This lesson will teach you how and when to use a BehaviorSubject to mitigate that problem.

rx tutorial about AsyncSubject: representing a computation that yields a final value

AsyncSubject: representing a computation that yields a final value

4:02 rx

This lesson will teach you about AsyncSubject, another type of Subject with some replaying logic inside. We will also look at some use cases for this peculiar RxJS subject variant.

rx tutorial about Subject: an Observable and Observer hybrid

Subject: an Observable and Observer hybrid

4:06 rx

This lesson teaches you how a Subject is simply a hybrid of Observable and Observer which can act as a bridge between the source Observable and multiple observers, effectively making it possible for multiple observers to share the same Observable execution.

rx tutorial about An Observable execution may only have one Observer

An Observable execution may only have one Observer

2:13 rx

Let's remind ourselves of a fundamental behavior of the Observable in RxJS, which is: each Observable execution has only one Observer. This means we cannot directly share one single Observable execution to multiple Observers.

rx tutorial about Introduction to RxJS Marble Testing

Introduction to RxJS Marble Testing

7:33 rx

Marble testing is an expressive way to test observables by utilizing marble diagrams. This lesson will walk you through the syntax and features, preparing you to start writing marble tests today!

rx tutorial about What RxJS operators are

What RxJS operators are

5:38 rx

We have covered the basics of what is Observable.create, and other creation functions. Now lets finally dive into operators, which are the focus of this course. We will see how operators are simple pure functions attached to the Observable type.

rx tutorial about Observables are the foundation in RxJS

Observables are the foundation in RxJS

0:54 rx

Let's conclude this course by reviewing what an Observable is: a way of representing many values being delivered in push-style from a lazy producer to a consumer. Let's also see how the Observable alone is not everything in RxJS. It serves as the foundation to operators, which are the most useful feature of RxJS.

rx tutorial about Let's learn RxJS

Let's learn RxJS

1:00 rx

This lesson is to kickstart our course on RxJS Observables and their operators. Know what is the purpose of this series and which RxJS version we will use while learning.

rx tutorial about Creating Observable From Scratch

Creating Observable From Scratch

14:17 rx

Get a better understanding of the RxJS Observable by implementing one that's similar from the ground up.

rx tutorial about Starting a Stream with SwitchMap

Starting a Stream with SwitchMap

5:48 rx

As developers, we tend to carry over ideas from past experience and try to reapply them to something new. This lesson teaches you about why you should usually favor switchMap over subscribe and why thinking about subscribe as an event handler can lead to problems.

rx tutorial about Overview of Cycle.js

Overview of Cycle.js

2:28 rx

This lesson shows what can be learned next as a continuation of this course, and gives a recap on the core concepts: main for pure logic, drivers for side effects, run() to connect main and drivers, sources for read effects, sinks for write effects, and nesting Cycle.js apps to work as components.

rx tutorial about Exporting values from components through sinks

Exporting values from components through sinks

3:30 rx

Our app is not yet a BMI calculator, because it only has two sliders, but doesn't show the calculated BMI number. In this lesson we will learn how to export any stream from a child component and use it in the parent component, in order to display the BMI calculation on the DOM.

rx tutorial about Isolating component instances

Isolating component instances

3:39 rx

We added classNames to pre-processing and post-processing steps when calling the LabeledSlider, in order to instances independent of each other. It would be better if we could hide these steps away. This lesson introduces the isolate() helper function to achieve that.

rx tutorial about Multiple independent instances of a component

Multiple independent instances of a component

4:31 rx

Once we have a labeled slider component inside the main function, we should be able to create another labeled slider. This lesson teaches how to accomplish that, and make sure those two instances work independently of each other.

rx tutorial about Using the component in the main() function

Using the component in the main() function

1:57 rx

We have made a Cycle.js app for generic labeled slider which can be configured through props, but how can we reuse it in other Cycle.js apps? This lesson shows how we can embed any Cycle program inside a larger Cycle program in a very simple manner.

rx tutorial about Our first component: a labeled slider

Our first component: a labeled slider

8:05 rx

We are starting to get a better architecture for these UI apps. But we still have a problem of repeating code for the sliders, since they share so much in common in looks and functionality. This lessons shows how we can create a generic labeled slider as a main() function receiving properties as sources.

rx tutorial about Model-View-Intent pattern for separation of concerns

Model-View-Intent pattern for separation of concerns

3:17 rx

We built the BMI calculator all inside one function: main(). As apps scale, we don't want main() to grow. We need an organized pattern where each function focuses on doing one thing. This lesson shows how we can easily refactor the main() function into three parts: Intent, Model, and View.

rx tutorial about Body-Mass Index calculator built in Cycle.js

Body-Mass Index calculator built in Cycle.js

6:40 rx

So far we have been writing very small apps in Cycle.js. Let's start growing the size of the apps we build. This time, we will see how to build a simple Body-Mass Index Calculator.

rx tutorial about Using the HTTP Driver

Using the HTTP Driver

12:19 rx

Let's see next how to use the HTTP driver to generate requests and capture responses. We will build a small app to fetch a single piece of data from a REST server and display that on the DOM.

rx tutorial about An interactive counter in Cycle.js

An interactive counter in Cycle.js

8:08 rx

This lesson shows how we can create a more interactive app: a counter display with buttons to increment and decrement it. This reveals how we can use the RxJS scan() operator to remember past values and keep state.

rx tutorial about From toy DOM Driver to real DOM Driver

From toy DOM Driver to real DOM Driver

4:52 rx

This lessons shows how we are able to easily swap our toy DOM Driver with the actual Cycle.js DOM Driver, a more solid, more flexible, more efficient implementation.

rx tutorial about Hyperscript as our alternative to template languages

Hyperscript as our alternative to template languages

2:53 rx

Usually we use template languages like Handlebars, JSX, and Jade to create. One simple way we can create our own template language is to write a function that returns these objects for us. This lessons shows how we can use these functions as a DSL to create our DOM description objects.

rx tutorial about Fine-grained control over the DOM Source

Fine-grained control over the DOM Source

2:58 rx

What if we wanted to change the behavior of our app reset the timer every time the mouse hovers over it? Currently we only support clicks, and they are hard coded in the DOM Driver. This lesson will introduce DOMSource.selectEvents(), a way of making the DOM Source rich and allowing the main() function to determine which read effects it needs.

rx tutorial about Making our toy DOM Driver more flexible

Making our toy DOM Driver more flexible

5:22 rx

Our previous toy DOM Driver is still primitive. We are only able to send strings as the textContent of the container element. We cannot yet create headers and inputs and all sorts of fancy DOM elements. In this lesson we will see how to send objects that describe what elements should exist, instead of strings as the DOM sink.

rx tutorial about Generalizing run() function for more types of sources

Generalizing run() function for more types of sources

4:23 rx

Our application was able to produce write effects, through sinks, and was able to receive read effects, through the DOM sources. However, the main function only gets the DOMSource as input. This lessons shows how we can generalize main to receive an object of sources, containing all kinds of read effects that we can use.

rx tutorial about Read effects from the DOM: click events

Read effects from the DOM: click events

6:00 rx

So far we only had effects that write something to the external world, we are not yet reading anything from the external world into our app. This lesson shows how we can change the DOM Driver to return a "DOM Source" representing read effects, such as click events. We will leverage that to create an interactive application.

rx tutorial about Introducing run() and driver functions

Introducing run() and driver functions

4:06 rx

The last part of the code we wrote is neither logic nor effects. It is code which ties together logic (main) with effects. We can encapsulate that in a run() function. This lesson shows how we can structure these pieces together, and generalize effect handling with "drivers".

rx tutorial about Customizing effects from the main function

Customizing effects from the main function

2:05 rx

How can we show one string on the DOM, and a completely different string on Console log? This lesson shows how we can make our main function return multiple Observables, each one targeted at a different type of effect.

rx tutorial about Main function and effects functions

Main function and effects functions

2:10 rx

We need to give structure to our application with logic and effects. This lessons shows how we can organize our code into two parts: main() function for logic, and effects functions for effects.

rx tutorial about The Cycle.js principle: separating logic from effects

The Cycle.js principle: separating logic from effects

3:30 rx

This lesson is the first in an introduction to Cycle.js. We will see how to build from scratch a toy version of Cycle.js. See how to use RxJS to create simple web apps, and how to separate logic from effects.

rx tutorial about Yolk (An RxJS UI Library) in 7 Minutes

Yolk (An RxJS UI Library) in 7 Minutes

6:48 rx

Yolk is a small library that works in tandem with RxJS to render handle events and render out HTML using JSX. If you already understand RxJS, Yolk is a very simple addition to your front-end toolbelt. If you're just learning RxJS, Yolk is also an excellent way to practice using Observable and figuring out how they work together by building familiar UI applications.

rx tutorial about Understand Reactive Programming using RxJS

Understand Reactive Programming using RxJS

4:31 rx

This lesson introduces Reactive Programming using RxJS in simple terms, with a concrete example and no scary terminology.

rx tutorial about Demystifying Cold and Hot Observables in RxJS

Demystifying Cold and Hot Observables in RxJS

3:50 rx

Have you ever been caught by complications surrounding Cold and Hot Observables with RxJS (Reactive Extensions for JavaScript)? Worry no more, there is only one "catch" to understand, and then the whole issue will make sense to you when developing reactive applications.

rx tutorial about RxJS - map vs flatMap

RxJS - map vs flatMap

2:35 rx

What is the difference between map and flatMap? How do you take an Observable of Observables and output a single stream? This lesson is a quick look at map and flatMap and how they relate.

rx tutorial about RxJS Observables vs Promises

RxJS Observables vs Promises

6:53 rx

Let's look at some of the basic features of RxJS Observables as asynchronous primitives, by comparing them to their cousins, Promises.

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