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    Create a New Project by Cloning the Boilerplate Project
    8m 13s

Create a New Project by Cloning the Boilerplate Project

Andy Van Slaars
InstructorAndy Van Slaars

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Having a boilerplate project on GitHub makes creating a new project as easy as cloning the project, making a few small adjustments and creating a new git repository for the clone. In this lesson, we’ll clean up the sample code we used to make sure everything was working along the way and then we’ll create a new project with all of the tooling and configuration in place by cloning the boilerplate.

Jexxie
Jexxie
~ 2 years ago

Awesome tutorials! One more question, could you show how to organize Github Repo of Branches and Releases, like the way your setup each commit for a branch?

Jake Wiesler
Jake Wiesler
~ 2 years ago

Great video series Andy! Just a bit of feedback for this video. It's not a huge deal because we're creating a boilerplate with the expectation that users of said boilerplate will npm install dependencies, but when removing the .git directory (rm -rf .git), it also removes all of the hooks installed by husky. To get the hooks back you'd have to re-install husky.

Andy Van Slaars
Andy Van Slaarsinstructor
~ 2 years ago

Great video series Andy! Just a bit of feedback for this video. It's not a huge deal because we're creating a boilerplate with the expectation that users of said boilerplate will npm install dependencies, but when removing the .git directory (rm -rf .git), it also removes all of the hooks installed by husky. To get the hooks back you'd have to re-install husky.

Thanks for the feedback @jake. In the last section of the video we do an npm i, which under normal conditions will run husky's post-install script that will put the hooks in place.

Andy Van Slaars
Andy Van Slaarsinstructor
~ 2 years ago

Awesome tutorials! One more question, could you show how to organize Github Repo of Branches and Releases, like the way your setup each commit for a branch?

@jexxie, The way I structure the repo like this for lessons is by making sure I have a commit for the end of each lesson. I tag the commits as I go and when I'm through everything, I create a branch from each tag like git checkout -b NEW_BRANCH_NAME SOURCE_TAG_NAME. You could also create branches as you go, creating a branch, committing as you go and creating the next branch when it makes sense.

You might also want to check out this egghead course on git

Ilham Wahabi
Ilham Wahabi
~ 2 years ago

Great course, many new things to learn. I'm waiting for another react lesson from you :)

Agustin Quintanilla
Agustin Quintanilla
~ 2 years ago

Awesome Andy! thank you for this great course. I'm sure I'll continue use CRA and other popular boilerplates for my daily work, but now I'm have a better perspective of what are behind the scenes

Janis
Janis
~ 2 years ago

Thanks for the tutorial series, Andy! Ok, so I consumed this cover to cover and redid everything in code to follow along... What's the next step? What should I do now to gain more skill? Thanks

Negin Basiri
Negin Basiri
~ a year ago

I see many security alerts on github, what to do for those? Also thanks for creating amazing content in this course

Andy Van Slaars
Andy Van Slaarsinstructor
~ a year ago

I see many security alerts on github, what to do for those? Also thanks for creating amazing content in this course

Typically library updates will resolve vulnerabilities if the libraries have been updated with fixes. You can use npm's audit capabilities to automate this - https://docs.npmjs.com/cli/audit.