illustration for Up and Running with redux-observable

Up and Running with redux-observable

Instructor

Shane Osbourne
1h 20m closed-captioning
Star icon$$$
Star icon$$$
Star icon$$$
Star icon$$$
Star icon$$$
4.5
550
people completed
Bookmark
Download
RSS

Note: RxJS imports have changed since the publication of this course. Operators now must be passed into .pipe to be applied to an observable.

In this course we will begin with nothing more than an empty directory & a text editor. Through small, focussed lessons we’ll learn how to setup a React project that uses Redux for state management and redux-observable for asynchronous actions. We’ll see how ‘epics’ are registered and how they each receive a ‘stream’ of actions from the store.

With an understanding of how things work, we’ll move onto solving common problems such as Ajax cancellation, creating sequences of async actions, enabling code reuse through higher-order Observables and much more.

UPDATE:

This course is outdated, view updated material here: Asynchronous State Management with redux-observable v1

Learner Reviews

  • Daniel
    a year ago
    Star icon$$$
    Star icon$$$
    Star icon$$$
    Star icon$$$
    Star icon$$$
    What did you like about this course?

    Very in depth, rapid pace. Answered the issues I was looking into.

  • Audrys
    2 years ago
    Star icon$$$
    Star icon$$$
    Star icon$$$
    Star icon$$$
    Star icon$$$
    How will you use what you learned from this course?

    This might be only about 'redux-observables', but I believe supporting code still should be clean - people watching this might assume it's the way to write code :)

    • Test could be improved - a lot of nonsense have been tested during tutorial (e.g "actions count"," second call exact action" - it's not maintainable nor desired) most epics should be treated as black boxes (only at the end was proper use of tests)
    • using map does double job. Instead of ids.map(ids => ids.map((id) => url(id))), simple version could be used ids.map(url)
    • Use of redux/react -> mixed concerns logic (there's no place for decision in reducer - it's either thunk or epic (no all state available), view components leak implementation details - behaviour change will lead to dumb component change (e.g button click might be "search" or "whatever", while switching behaviour component should be not effected), too lazy to write more - check Dan's "Redux Idiomatic"
    • Comparison to "thunk" approach would be useful
  • Alireza
    2 years ago
    Star icon$$$
    Star icon$$$
    Star icon$$$
    Star icon$$$
    Star icon$$$
    What did you like about this course?

    Great practical examples and explanations

  • Marko Kovacevic
    2 years ago
    Star icon$$$
    Star icon$$$
    Star icon$$$
    Star icon$$$
    Star icon$$$
    What did you like about this course?

    Thanks for going into detail, but not too much and covering all the core information needed on using redux observable. Cheers!

  • Daniel
    2 years ago
    Star icon$$$
    Star icon$$$
    Star icon$$$
    Star icon$$$
    Star icon$$$
    What would make this course a 7 for you?

    Short, sharp and down to the point!

  • - -
    2 years ago
    Star icon$$$
    Star icon$$$
    Star icon$$$
    Star icon$$$
    Star icon$$$
    What would make this course a 7 for you?

    More advanced/real-life examples/tests coverage. Thanks!

Course Content

1h 20m • 13 lessons

    You might also like these resources:

    illustration for Introduction to Cloudflare Workers

    Introduction to Cloudflare Workers

    Kristian Freeman・36m・Course

    Become familiar with the Workers CLI wrangler that we will use to bootstrap our Worker project. From there you'll understand how a Worker receives and returns requests/Responses. We will also build this serverless function locally for development and deploy it to a custom domain.

    illustration for Create an eCommerce Store with Next.js and Stripe Checkout

    Create an eCommerce Store with Next.js and Stripe Checkout

    Colby Fayock・1h 4m・Course

    This is a practical project based look at building a working e-commerce store using modern tools and APIs. Excellent for a weekend side-project for your developer project portfolio

    illustration for Practical Git for Everyday Professional Use

    Practical Git for Everyday Professional Use

    Trevor Miller・1h・Course

    git is a critical component in the modern web developers tool box. This course is a solid introduction and goes beyond the basics with some more advanced git commands you are sure to find useful.