Getting a Pull Request Merged and Wrapping up

Kent C. Dodds
InstructorKent C. Dodds

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Published 6 years ago
Updated 3 years ago

Let’s look at the GitHub commits and list of contributors now that our pull request has been merged. And we’ll wrap this series up with a few tips. Feel free to practice on stack-overflow-copy-paste, and see the Pull Request demonstrated in this lesson here.

[00:00] Our pull request has been merged. It's time to celebrate.

[00:03] Let's take a look at the commit history to make sure that our commit is in there. We can see that our commit is here, but we'll also notice this merge commit here.

[00:11] When the project maintainer clicks the green merge button, GitHub runs a git merge command, but it adds a flag to the command which essentially forces a new commit to be created for the merge. Never fear, though. Your work is in the project as you made it.

[00:24] Now, let's look at the contributors graph. For this project, I actually am the only one who's made any changes, but after your pull request is merged you'll see a card representing your contributions, as well.

[00:34] That's our series. I hope you enjoyed it.

[00:36] Before we wrap up, I want to say that most of the Git commands that we have executed in this series are just one way to accomplish the same task. Git is a huge subject which I am unable to cover in depth for this series.

[00:48] There are many ways to do the same thing in Git, so I recommend you spend some time learning this ubiquitous source control management software.

[00:55] I also want to invite you to contribute to this repository, stack-overflow-copy-paste if you want to try this out. I don't expect anyone to actually use this module, but if you want to have a friendly place to practice feel free to file issues and pull requests. I would be more than happy to give you direction.

[01:12] Thank you for watching this series.

Khaled Garbaya
Khaled Garbaya
~ 5 years ago

Love the serie, thanks a lot . But I have a small question, when forcing push, won't this break semantic release process and require you to make a manual publish ?

Kent C. Dodds
Kent C. Doddsinstructor
~ 5 years ago

I'm glad you like the series! You're right to be concerned about force pushing. It can be dangerous and it can mess up semantic-release. But this is only true when you force push to the master branch. You can force push to any other branch just fine and because semantic-release doesn't do anything with those branches, it doesn't make a difference.

As a related note, I recommend that you protect your master branch from force pushes: https://help.github.com/articles/about-protected-branches/

Mike
Mike
~ 4 years ago

Love this series, because of this series I filed my first issue on GitHub and I plan on creating my own repo. Thanks!

Ioan Lucut
Ioan Lucut
~ 4 years ago

Thanks for the series!

Joey Ng'ethe
Joey Ng'ethe
~ 4 years ago

This series is great! Kent you continue to impact some invaluable knowledge. I have been using OSS for years now and I took your advice to contribute and give back to the community. I just opened my first PR for code sandbox for I used almost everyday nowadays. This year is the year to start giving back to the community and get my name out there on the map. Cheers!